Tuesday, September 01, 2009

Vegaculture

A week ago, we had a visit from a friend of mine from Victoria (Australia).. A guy named Zalan.. (we first met some 16 or more years ago at an international vegan festival in Spain).

Well, he was only around for a couple of days, but we got to share some durian in the sunshine, and will be seeing him again in a month or so as he's flown up to Cairns for a while, but will return before heading back down to central victoria..

Kveta, Me, Zalan
Kveta, Myself and Zalan, sharing a durian


Zalan's not fully fruitarian, but he is a long term raw vegan who eats a high percentage of fruit, in fact, the last few times I've met up with him, I can't really recall him eating much other than fruit.. He's currently working on a book on the topic of vegaculture..

I believe he may possibly have coined the term himself (thogh don't quote me on that!).. - Vegaculture is basically a method of sustainable compassionate gardening techniques loosely based on the whole Permaculture (permanent agriculture) concept. With the clear exception that vegaculture, unlike it's permaculture predecessor, is completely unreliant on any form of (mis)usage of animals, other, that is, than those occurring 100% naturally through the attraction of the biodiversity which it's principles encourage..

You're probably aware already that most organic, and especially biodynamic, food production is pretty heavily reliant on the animal abuse industry, using it's blood and bone meal byproducts in misguided attempts to enrich the soil..

durian on our little sitting wall.
Durian!


Vegaculture recognises that the usage of such slaughterhouse products is an unnecessary evil best avoided through composts and soils made using purely broken down vegetable matter and decomposing mulch, - especially fruit peal and leftovers (our little garden we have, gets 3 big buckets of compost added to it each week, and is both rich in colour, and alive with an abundance of worms!).

Also vegaculture, with it's roots in vegan ethics (hence the "Vegan Culture") and compassion, sees beyond keeping any animal species captive, and thus hens, goats and other animals would not be a feature of such a garden built on it's principles.. Unless of course they were natural wildlife visiting the jungle garden..

Me and zalan on Little bay beach under the hanging rocks.
Myself and Zalan on little bay beach


Well. his book is half way through, and once done I will be sure to write a review of it, and post a link to it in a new blog post.. (which I'll add a link to here too, on this page, if i remember, when done).

Peace,
Mango the raw vegan fruitarian

5 comments:

wo_dao said...

eh, I hear of "veganic gardening" and such similarities to vegaculture.

This is nice. Something that I seek to pursue.

=)

Julie said...

This is awesome! What more can I say?
It seems like you guys are all having so much fun eating exotic Durians! Something we can just dream of doing..

Anonymous said...

I heard from concrete sources that Mango has issues to get it up!. That's why he eats so many watermelons(natural Viagra).

Roulios

Australia.

Fruitarian Mango said...

Wo_dao. definitely veganic gardening or vegaculture is the way to go especially with heavy emphasis on fruit tree growing.. multiple diverse specied fruit tree orchards being the most sustainable ecological solution to food production there can be..

Julie.. just keep putting out there for it, and eventually it'll happen for you.. why don't you write a letter to local supermarkets encouraging them to get in durian? Sometimes just one letter to the right person is all it takes..

Roulios/Fred, your comments get progressively more bizarre, I'm guessing you can think of a better usage for the watermelons?

peace,
mango.

Shreyas Belle said...

Nice to hear about vegaculture. Here is a link that might interest you

http://blogs.thehindu.com/delhi/?p=23501

and here's another one related to the first

http://gyanpedia.in/tft/Resources/books/onestraw.pdf

Though they don't talk about fruitarianism, the principle that nature is the best caretaker is still shared.

Unfortunately Mr. Kailash Murthy's site http://www.the-anf.org/ doesn't seem to be working at the moment but I hope it does when you check it.